Now we know who the cowards are

To be a man is to be prepared for the harsh realities of life. Men are 23 times more likely to die in the workplace than women in the UK. Who falls off a roof, who gets crushed by a forklift? Not blue check feminists on Twitter. I’ll start worrying about the wage gap, when you start worrying about the workplace fatality gap.

Or, while we’re at it, the workplace injury gap. My father fell out of his truck and permanently injured his shoulder. Incidentally, he also saw a coworker torn to bits when the man walked a bit too close to some operating machinery in a factory. PTSD? That’s a term that doesn’t really seem to exist in the blue collar man’s dictionary.

The idea that we’re all equal is a bourgeois fantasy. In practice that fantasy just makes society worse. We’re much better off when we just accept the role that nature gave us. One man and ten women can have as many children in a year as ten men and ten women. The reality of nature is thus that men are disposable.

Men are less inclined to cling onto life, because their minds were molded over successive generations for that reality that they are disposable. What causes men to drink like fish, inject fentanyl in their SUVs in the Walmart parking lot, ride their motorcycles without helmets and blow up their hands with fireworks? It’s simple: They’re men. They’re designed to take risks and so they’ll take risks even when there’s nothing to gain out of them.

The most basic expectation that we placed on men throughout history is that they protect women and children from danger. When the Titanic began to sink, the men placed the women and children in safety first. In total, 74% of the women and 52% of the children on board of the Titanic were saved, but only 20% of the men. This isn’t even an expectation so much as it is something men do automatically without thinking about it.

It’s engrained in the male spirit that they wish to protect women and children from the harshest realities of life. The best example is probably the late Willem Symor, known as Pa Sem. When an airplane crashed into his apartment complex, he was burned beyond recognition. He could have made it out unscathed, but a girl pulled on his clothing and told him her brother was still inside, so he went back. He found the boy, but a hot burning pipe fell down on the child, so he pulled it up and his skin melted stuck onto the burning pipe, as the child made it out. These are the sort of stories we should teach boys about.

We despise cowards. There’s this infamous scene in Jurassic Park where the lawyer is stuck in a car with the two children when a T-Rex escapes. The lawyer leaves them alone and flees to hide on the toilet. It goes without saying that he’s subsequently eaten by the T-Rex, while everyone else survives. This ties into another famous trope, that a life of bourgeois opulence makes you decadent and weak. Authentic masculinity survives among a handful of working class men.

Why do I say this? Well, we’re in the middle of another crisis that mainly affects women and children.

A massive redistribution of wealth and power has taken place, to a handful of miserable Silicon Valley dorks, men who lack every form of virtue, who control our information outlets and want you to believe that you’ll drop dead the instant you leave your house and stop scrolling through their feeds. Women are social, particularly when they’re young. If you tell them to sit inside and stare at a screen, they’ll become deeply miserable.

But most importantly, think about the young. Think about what these people are doing to children. They’re turning little children into neurotic hypochondriacs. They’re teaching children that they have bugs on their hands that will kill their grandmothers. Women are secondary, children come first. Children’s innocence must be protected at all cost.

 

Let’s look at the simple facts.

-In the United States, surveys show that 25% of 18-24 year olds were suicidal in june, in the middle of summer, when most of the restrictions were gone.

-In Britain, girls are suffering genital mutilation because the schools are closed and the girls are isolated with their family.

-Worldwide, two million extra cases of female genital mutilation will take place, because the schools are closed and the aid workers are gone.

-In Kenya, twelve year old girls are “married off” (read: raped with the consent of their parents) because the schools are closed and tourism has been shut down.

-Worldwide, ten thousand children die every month from hunger, because society has been shut down.

-Worldwide, 150 million people will be pushed into extreme poverty.

That’s the cost of cowardice. I can forgive the first lockdown, although I told you from day one not to do this. People were genuinely expecting a world-ending catastrophe, as opposed to a common cold virus that kills you when a hysterical nurse decides to put you on a ventilator. But when it became clear that this is a virus that mainly kills nursing home residents with a few months of life left, this rapidly turned from stupidity into a severe moral failure.

There really is no proper term for this, other than cowardice. You’re dealing with a virus that is less dangerous than the flu for your children. The “long haul covid” stuff is a fancy term for chronic fatigue syndrome, suffered by neurotic young women who survive off a diet of glutenfree vegan raw avocado-quinoa-spinach smoothies. Look at Japan, look at Sweden, look at Florida, look at Belarus. It’s abundantly clear that society can cope without the restrictions. It doesn’t take a genius to understand this.

What is cowardice? Cowardice is when fear for your own safety leads you to pass suffering onto those who did nothing to deserve it. It is perhaps the worst indignity we can bestow upon ourselves. The cowards have exposed themselves.

Fortunately, there are people who have been trying to stop this episode of worldwide mass psychosis. You probably know the names of some of the prominent ones: Sunetra Gupta, John Ioaniddis, Alex Berenson, Maurice de Hond, Jay Bhattacharya, Kulvinder Kaur, to name a few. But we have people from all walks of life.

It’s the elderly in the nursing homes who revolt against this, the lady in the street who says “I’m 83, I don’t give a sod”, it’s the people who are protesting in the streets and organizing secret parties, people who walk into the supermarket without a mask. This is a war that’s fought with a thousand small gestures. We’re at war after all, not so much with a shadowy group of people, but first and foremost with our own human moral shortcomings. It’s a collective outbreak of cowardice, that allowed this to happen. We sacrificed our values when we became afraid.

As Thomas Paine would say, these are the times that try men’s souls. It might not feel like a war, but it is in fact a cold war. On one side we have a group of people who sympathize with a utilitarian technocracy where human rights are granted by the government in reward for obedience and where disobedient people end up in concentration camps.

On the other side, there are those of us who believe that human rights were granted to us by God, that any government that dares to violate our God given rights exposes its own illegitimacy. In the words of Thomas Jefferson: “All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. the general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God. These are grounds of hope for others. For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.”

We live in an era where the odds are stacked against us, but I would rather go down with a fight than to abandon the basic principles of Western civilization. Western civilization abolished slavery around the world. The abilition of slavery was a natural outgrowth of our worldview. Now we’re faced off against a regime that aims to turn us into slaves of the government, our faces scanned by cameras with algorithms that recognize our ethnic heritage, our organs harvested when we run foul of the regime.

The battle lines are being drawn in the sand as we speak, the rift in society should be apparent to all. In America it is the Christian rural people and the working classes, who ask for little more than to be left alone and able to manage their own affairs, versus the secular urban bourgeoisie, who believe themselves ordained to micromanage everyone’s lives.

Globally, the 21st century will be dominated by the inevitable conflict between China and India. One of these nations gave us the Gautama Buddha and the Bhagavad Gita, the other one gave us the deadliest tyrant of the 20th century, a man whose regime survives to this day. Look at who has been urging on a return to normal and you will find Indian doctors and academics. Look at who has been pushing fear onto the people and you will find academics who sympathize with the Chinese regime.

When Mao Zedong was told that people were committing suicide in droves during his Cultural Revolution that served the purpose of strenghtening his power when control was drifting away from him towards the bureaucracy, he commented: “People who try to commit suicide—don’t attempt to save them! . . . China is such a populous nation, it is not as if we cannot do without a few people.”

That’s the reality of secular Marxist collectivism: A human life becomes very cheap. On the other hand, the very basis of Indian philosophy is to commit no cruelty. Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and Hinduism, are all different evolutions of the very same basic principle: Ahimsa. For the Jain it means not stepping on insects, for the Sikh it means giving vegetarian food to those in need.

The very basis of Christian philosophy in turn, is the fundamental dignity of every individual. Why do Indian doctors see through the façade? Indian philosophy. Why do conservative Christians see through the façade? Because of Christian philosophy. Christians should recognize that Indian polytheism is a way of expressing the many different aspects of God’s nature, for which Christians traditionally used saints.

I know that you will think that I am exaggerating, that I am turning this into some sort of epic struggle without justification, that it’s “cringe” andsoforth. But I would counter that you don’t understand my point, because you grew up during easy times that made you decadent. We’re dealing with a very real conflict here, that has robbed people of their lives, hopes, dignity and dreams. We betrayed our children. You need to know who your allies are and you need to know who your enemies are. This is not an unfortunate event that interfered with a year of your life, it’s the start of a difficult and challenging period that will test your moral character.

The society you live in expects you to die alone in a nursing home now, with your family prohibited from seeing you. That’s the only message the Chinese regime founded by Mao has for you: You don’t matter. Your life means nothing. But to all of the young men reading along here, I hope that when you die, it’s in the Himalayas from a Chinese bullet, that pierced your copy of the Gita before piercing your heart.

To those of you on the right side of history, I salute you.

11 Comments

  1. Wearing a mask isn’t that oppressive and it reduces spread. Wash hands, same.

    Meh

    I think most people don’t care as long as the irresponsible are the ones taking risk with themselves, but when they take risk with others by being inconsiderate it’s the same as drunk driving but waaaaay worse because it’s multiplicative.

    There certainly are many bourgeoisie tyrants making irrational laws that do nothing to slow the spread or save lives , but you can reject those without rejecting common sense things like wearing a mask in public and not breathing down people’s necks.

    Come to Texas where you only have to wear mask in buildings and there is nothing else, in some parts of texas there is not even masking, nobody would do it so it is unenforceable.
    you can also just die for anything here because you have no medical care unless you are rich.

    It’s not as fun as you think to get a minor treatable illness and die because you have no access to doctor, diagnosis or medicine.

    Truth is you have been coddled by western civilization welfare state, if you come out here to the colonias and see how precarious life is you might soften your stance a bit.

    Literally almost everyone I knew growing up is dead, in prison, actually insane living in the streets, or a junkie. I survived all of this and realize just a little bit of consideration and building ways out of the darwinian culture is a virtuous cycle that makes society better for everyone and the solipsistic individualist darwinian attitude can push your society into a state it is difficult and rare to emerge from.

    Just the level of harshness,shittiness, ignorance and misery from one state to the next in the USA is a culture shock. The level of desperation in many republican states and their entire scarcity worldview perpetuates itself.

    I didn’t understand kindness or people that weren’t cutthroat when i first experienced it, I was confused and had a hard time with figuring out what was happening socially.

  2. This is a severe distortion of what the US is really like, other than the Texas part(I’m happy to say). I can go to work, supermarket, and church generally unharassed by mask-nazis.

    The whole cutthroat part and unfriendly people simply isn’t true. Once I left NEETdom to join the blue collar workforce I was constantly amazed at how nice people were to me. Have you ever tried MDMA or san Pedro? That could help you significantly.

  3. >A massive redistribution of wealth and power has taken place, to a handful of miserable Silicon Valley dorks, men who lack every form of virtue, who control our information outlets and want you to believe that you’ll drop dead the instant you leave your house and stop scrolling through their feeds.

    Assuming by “dorks” you mean the programmers/engineers and other technical workers, I strongly disagree with this sentiment. I am one of those “dorks” and I can say with confidence that not every programmer, but most, are intelligent and sensible people. Definitely more on the side of truth and liberty than not, and most are against the lockdowns and hysteria, and absolutely against the censorship and political nonsense.

    The enemies are the lawyer/HR/PR/media types, and to a lesser extent, the business consultant and finance types. These are the spoiled children who grow up to become professional parasites, and want to impose their “values” on the rest of the world. They don’t build or create anything, they wait for the “dorks” to do all of the hard work and use debt and government regulation to stuff tech companies full of their kind, and the non-technical bureaucracy grows until they have control. These are the people calling the shots when ideas and people get censored, not the programmers or even the founders.

    By the way, “soft skills” is a euphemism meaning what “good breeding” used to mean. The idea that programmers are “dorks” and lack social skill is almost entirely a myth. It’s just that we don’t have a social network to rely on for good jobs, so we have to learn a real skill to move up in the world. We are not the people getting art degrees and backpacking in Asia, by the way.

    • >Assuming by “dorks” you mean the programmers/engineers and other technical workers, I strongly disagree with this sentiment. I am one of those “dorks” and I can say with confidence that not every programmer, but most, are intelligent and sensible people. Definitely more on the side of truth and liberty than not, and most are against the lockdowns and hysteria, and absolutely against the censorship and political nonsense.

      It depends on the company and role. I work for a large high-paying tech company as a programmer (that hires from and loses people to FAANG), and I would say the majority of FAANG/corporate programmers are pro-masks, pro-lockdown, apathetic to censorship (happy with soft-censorship), and range from (american) liberal to far-left. There is a political discussion group in our company chat app, and any GOP-sympathetics use overwhelmingly moderate, qualifying language and quickly realize they are unwanted in that group.

      There are libertarian types, but more libertarian in the FIRE, workaholic, high competency aesthetic and less in the own-a-gun, uses-TOR-and-duck-duck-go aesthetic.

    • To add another qualification, my anecdotes are from the sub-40y.o tech industry in coastal cities. Older companies, midwest companies I’m sure don’t have less corporate dorks.

  4. It wasn’t that cringe.. Until the last sentence!

    A constant disparagment of the leisure class and bourgeoise,it is so that we hate what we are becoming?

    Gotta read between the lines on this one, but a rousing speech nonetheless

  5. You talk about closing schools, but suppose that hypothetically, you reopen them fully, pretending that COVID had never happened. Who’s going to teach the classes? Any teacher teaching elementary or middle-school kids will be pretty much resigned to contracting the virus over the school year. The virus has a 0.1% mortality rate among 40+ year olds. That’s 1 in 1000. If you think about it, that’s actually *really* high. Call me a coward if you want, but I would certainly not take a job with a 1 in 1000 mortality rate within the next year. Would you? Not to mention the long-term health consequences, or that some teachers may be living with elderly relatives. My point is, even if schools open under the premise that the virus is not deadly to kids so it’s perfectly fine if they all contract the disease, there won’t be enough teachers left to teach them.

    And I fail to understand why you complain so much about masks. Putting on a mask is about as inconvenient as wearing a helmet while riding a bike. And there’s literally no question that masks *do* slow down the spread. That’s basic common sense: a mask will reduce the number of particles that exit and enter your mouth, thereby lowering the chances of contracting or spreading the virus. It’s debatable how effective the masks actually are, of course—whether it slows things down by 50% or 0.01% is up in the air—but claiming masks don’t help *at all* is nonsensical.

    Honestly, COVID posts like these are why I stopped reading your blog a few months back. It seems more and more clear to me that you’re just speaking out of emotional frustration—which is perfectly understandable given your unfortunate lockdown situation—rather than level-headed logic. You raise some valid points about the impact COVID has had on people, but the biggest question you fail to answer is: what’s your solution? How would you have responded to this crisis back in March, say, if you had the power? I’ll even grant you full knowledge in hindsight.

    • For the record, this is what I would do if I had dictatorial power: speedrun the vaccines. Any% speedrun. I fully believe that given enough motivation and funding, a vaccine should have been available to the public as early as last summer. At such a rapid development, the vaccine certainly won’t be 100% safe, and some people will see negative reactions, possibly even death, but I’d much rather have that than the current COVID situation. Of course, people can opt-out of the vaccine if they don’t want to take that risk.

  6. > We live in an era where the odds are stacked against us, but I would rather go down with a fight than to abandon the basic principles of Western civilization. Western civilization abolished slavery around the world. The abilition of slavery was a natural outgrowth of our worldview.

    Uh no the basic principle of Western civilization was racist pagan feudalism. Universal equality is a foreign christian principle, not a native European principle.

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